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    Red-legged Kittiwakes (Rissa breuirostris) and black-legged Kittiwakes (R. Tridactyla) will be observed by recording the following; 1) Timing of egg laying and hatching 2) Number of eggs laid 3) Proportion of nest where eggs were laid, chicks hatched and chicks fledged. Location(s): St. Paul, St. Goerge and Bogoslof Islands. An NPMR project

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    Subsurface mooring data from Unimak Pass, Aleutian Islands: Station Unimak Pass 5. Data were collected from 1994 through 2004. Sampled months varied through the years but were usually during September. Depth and temperature data were collected at various depths throughout the years using instruments such as Pressure Gauges. 98m was the maximum bottom depth.

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    Data Type: Exxon Valdez Oil Spill; Locations of long term ADEC monitoring stations which tracked oil within the intertidal zones. These sites provided information used in ADEC's final reports, "Prince William Sound and Homer Regions Shoreline Evaluation Group Final Report" and "Evaluation of Oil Impacted Shoreline in the Kodiak/Alaska Peninsula Regions."

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    Data Type: Fish ; This database is used to evaluate hatchery practices and estimate hatchery contributions. It is used for in-season fisheries management and a variety of research and restoration activities. Fish are tracked from release to return. The database is part of the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission coast wide database used to monitor salmonoid fish and steelhead as part of the US-Canada fisheries treaty.

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    Data Type: Exxon Valdez Oil Spill; Bioremediation test site for Prince William Sound. Data is referenced to beach segments and could be linked to ADEC's GIS system.

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    This data set contains SST field temperatures at 14 km resolution for the Gulf of California. The Office of Satellite Data Processing and Distribution (OSDPC) keeps this data for a month, then sends it to the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) for archiving. For current data, contact John Sapper at OSDPC, telephone 301-457-0914 ext.148, e-mail: john.sapper@noaa.gov. For archived data contact Thomas Ross at NCDC, telephone 828-271-4499, e-mail: tom.ross@noaa.gov.

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    Data Type: Remotely Sensed Data; A TM instrument is flown on Landsat 4 and 5, the last two of the five Landsats. Both satellite's TM radiometers acquire day and night data which are systematically corrected during processing. The standard digital data product is in a band sequential (BSQ) FAST format. Landsat 4 and 5's TM mechanical scanning radiometers operate in 7 channels of the electromagnetic spectrum (band 1 spectral range is .45-.52 micometers, band 2 is .52-.60, band 3 is .63-.69, band 4 is .76-.90, band 5 is 1.55-1.75, band 6 is 10.40-12.50, and band 7 is 2.08-2.35). Six reflective bands are blue, green, red, and near infrared. Two shortwave infrared bands and a band measuring emitted energy 10.4 to 12.5 micrometers and has 120 meter ground resolution. Landsat 4 was launched 7/16/82 with Landsat 5 following on 3/1/84. Paths 57-68 and Rows 17-20 cover Prince William Sound Copper River Region and Glacier Bay Ecosystem Initiative Areas.

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    We will conduct a pilot study on the use of airborne lidar (LIght Detecting And Ranging) and 3-chip digital video to assess epipelagic biological features such as forage fish schools, zooplankton, large individual fish (e.g., salmon), marine mammals and seabirds. The results of this study are designed to supplement new and ongoing research in the Bering Sea and North Pacific, addressing several of the NPMR issues including monitoring, forage fish and apex community ecology, and effects of climate change on the biology of the systems. This study falls in the categories of remote sensing and field studies. A lidar produces short pulses of laser light which pass through the water's surface and reflect off biological features in the water column, and processes the returning signal. When mounted along with a video camera in a down-looking configuration from the belly of an aircraft, we can use the combined data to produce a three dimensional array of the biological features. When conducted over ground survey transects that include oceanography, net catches, acoustics, and bird and mammal counts, the processed lidar and video images can be properly interpreted and related to ocean conditions. We propose to overfly ground survey transects, collect continuous spatial data within each transect, and replicate the surveys both during the day and at night. We plan to conduct these surveys synoptic with ongoing ground survey programs (including Inner Fronts, US GLOBEC and/or Ocean Carrying Capacity). This technique could overcome many of the shortcomings of traditionally applied technology. Those include: 1) the lack of spatial resolution, 2) difficulty in performing synoptic data collection, 3) a mismatch in comparing temporal and spatial scale (due to the speed of vessels versus the time frame of biological activity bursts or diurnal patterns), and 4) high cost (ground surveys can be reduced). In California, lidar surveys have been evaluated for assessments of pelagic sardines and anchovy as a way to reduce the shipboard time involved due to the low relative cost of remote sensing at high speeds. In order to fully evaluate this technique in Alaskan waters, we intend to conduct surveys in two separate oceanographic regions, namely the Bering Sea and northern regions of the Pacific Ocean adjacent to the Alaskan coast. This project also includes; Brenda Norcross University of Alaska Fairbanks James Churnside Environmental Technology Laboratory, NOAA An NPMR project

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    Subsurface mooring data from St. George Island, Bering Sea: Station St. George Island 4. Data were collected from 1994 through 2004. Sampled months varied through the years but were usually during February. Salinity, temperature, and UV vector data were collected at various depths throughout the years using instruments such as MTR, RCM-7, and RCM-9. 151m was the maximum bottom depth.

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    Data Type: Remotely Sensed Data; Unsupervised classification of SPOT image K461/J226 into 256 classes. The raw image was purchased from SPOT and classified by Ducks Unlimited Inc.