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    No abstract was givien, contact provider for more information

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    No abstract was givien, contact provider for more information

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    No abstract was givien, contact provider for more information

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    No abstract was givien, contact provider for more information

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    To date, most lower trophic level research on the eastern Bering Sea shelf has concentrated on the role of the spring diatom bloom as the main annual production event. Over the Middle Shelf Domain, primary and secondary productions occur throughout the summer supported by regenerated nutrients. During this period, standing stock of chlorophyll is relatively low (0.5 - 2 µg/l). Periodic outbreaks of diatoms can occur in response to erosion of the pycnocline and injection of nitrate and silicate into the surface waters. Between these outbreaks, nano- and microzooplankton (<200 µm) are hypothesized to dominate nutrient cycling. During these periods microzooplankton may also provide the intermediary link between small flagellated primary producers and food for juvenile fishes. Recent recurring "blooms" of the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi require us to achieve a better understanding of summertime nutrient recycling and trophic transfer so that we can predict the effect, if any, E. huxleyi will have on higher trophic levels. We plan to dissect the summer pelagic food web and nutrient cycle of the Middle Shelf Domain to determine the relative contribution of microzooplankton to these processes. Specifically we will investigate nutrient cycling and trophic transfer during two distinct phytoplankton communities: small flagellates (coccolithophores or other species) and diatoms. Juvenile Pollock, a nodal species in the Bering Sea ecosystem, forage on particle-grazing mesozooplankton and variations in summer food supply may affect their ability to accumulate energy stores for the harsh Subarctic winters. This project also includes; Evelyn Lessard University of Washington Jeffrey Napp Alaska Fisheries Science Center, NOAA 7600 Sand Point Way NE Seattle, WA 98115 jeff.napp@noaa.gov An NPMR project

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    This two-part project will inform the public about NPMR through a radio series about the Bering Sea and a high school/junior high level classroom reference guide to the Bering Sea, both based on NPMR areas of study. The U.S. Congress intends that NPMR studies lead to greater understanding of ecosystem dynamics in the North Pacific Ocean, and the transfer of useful findings to people and groups who have an economic, social, or moral stake in the long-term health of the region. Users of the information include the scientific community, policy makers, resource managers, marine industries (especially the commercial fishing industry), conservationists, subsistence users, and the general public. Part one of this project is a 12-installment radio series based on NPMR areas of study. The series will be broadcast on Alaska Public Radio stations and on other broadcast outlets in and outside Alaska. The stories will explain key physical, chemical, and biological phenomena in the ecosystem to provide the public with a good understanding of the basic make-up and dynamics of the North Pacific ecosystem. Possible subjects include the effect of the ice edge on primary production, the effect of sea surface temperature on selected marine animals, circulation and upwelling patterns and their effects on commercially important fish and shellfish, the relationship between climate change and the ecology of marine mammals, and Native perspectives on how specific components of the ecosystem have appeared to have changed over the past half century. Each of the 12 radio segments will be 5 minutes long and include high quality digitized sound effects recorded in the field, and first-person interviews with NPMR scientists. Part two of this project will be a classroom guide to the Bering Sea, aimed at junior high/high school level students and teachers. The book will include information covered by the radio series, augmented by additional text, color photos, various figures such as maps and information graphics, and color illustrations of North Pacific marine plants and animals and their habitats. The book will include an index of terms and place names, and a glossary of terms. http://www2.sfos.uaf.edu:8080/npmr/projects/data/124/project124.html http://www.uaf.edu/seagrant An NPMR project

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    Southeastern Bering Sea shelf and slope. Counts of individuals and life stages for all major taxa of Zooplankton covering spring, summer and autumn. Data are depth-stratified and extend to 1200 meters.

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    This data is a subset of the Fleet Numerical Oceanographic Center (FNOC) gridded wind data for the Bering Sea and the Gulf of Alaska near Kodiak Island These data span the years 1976 to 1982, and are stored on 54 disk files (48.9 MB) at the Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory in Seattle, Washington. NOAAServer Codes: [L 70 50 -130 -180] ; nodateline

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    The stimulus for Processes and Resources of the Eastern Bering Sea Shelf (PROBES) was a mutual US - Japan scientific concern about the ability of the Bering Sea to support the huge annual catch, on a sustained basis, of groundfish, pelagic fish, crab and other marine resources. The question was large enough to demand the attention of oceanographic disciplines from both countries as well as from others. After several conferences, it was decided to emphasize the "Golden Triangle" (the are encompassed southeastern Bering Sea shelf in an attempt to understand the bioproductivity of this region (Hood and Kelley 1974, Hood and Takenouti 1975). In the beginning, it appeared most expedient, for logistic and funding reasons, to have each country pursue its part of the program independently.