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North America

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    The systematics and distributional ecology of component members of phoxocephalidean amphipod subfamilies Parharpiniinae, Pontharpiniinae, Brolginae, Phoxocephalinae, and Harpiniinae in coastal waters of the Pacific coast of North America, from the Bering Sea to northern California, are analyzed. Of the 22 regional species here recorded, the 11 species (50%) are new to science: Pontharpiniinae: Mandibulophoxus mayi, new species; M. alaskensis, new species; Brolginae: Paraphoxus rugosus new species, P. pacificus, new species, P. communis, new species, P. gracilis, new species, and P. similis, new species; Phoxocephalinae: Parametaphoxus quaylei, new species; Harpiniinae: Pseudharpinia inexpectata, new species; Heterophoxus conlanae, new species, and H. ellisi, new species. Biogeographically, the subfamilies Parharpiniinae and Pontharpiniinae, dominant along temperate-tropical Indo-Pacific and antipodean shores, appear to be relict along northeastern Pacific shores. The Brolginae, common in protected coastal shallows of the northern and southern hemispheres, the Phoxocephalinae, world-wide mainly in deeper shelf waters, and the Harpiniinae, dominant on finer sediments and in deeper waters of the northern hemisphere, are well represented in the present study region. Within the present study region, the total number of species of these five subfamilies combined is slightly less than that of the single regional subfamily Metharpiniinae (Jarrett and Bousfield, 1994). The present species were also taken less abundantly at stations with sandy sedimentary bottoms. Such bias may reflect their overall preference for finer, softer sediments, at greater depths, habitats that were not extensively sampled in present surveys. Only a few species of these subfamilies, notably within the primitive sand-burrowing Pontharpiniinae, occur commonly intertidally.

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    Long term monitoring program of physical oceanographic properties at La Perouse Bank, including some sites along the west coast of Vancouver Island (Nootka Sound, Barkley Sound, Brooks Peninsula).

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    Deep water renewal study of Nootka Sound

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    NOAA Coast Watch is designed to provide federal and state decision makers and researchers with rapid access to satellite data imagery of U.S. coastal and offshore regions. The primary product is sea surface temperature from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) instrument onboard NOAA's Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites. In addition, AVHRR Channel 1, Channel 2, and solar zenith angles are available for selected subregions for calculating turbidity. Images are available for the U.S. northeast coast, southeast coast, Great Lakes, Gulf of Mexico, Aleutian Islands and Hawaiian Islands at 1.1 km and 4 km resolutions. U.S west coast images are available at 4 km resolution. Images of Puerto Rico and Jamaica are available at 1.1 km resolution. Over 280,000 images have been archived at the National Oceanographic Data Center since 1990. These data are currently available online to researchers, educators and decision makers via NODC's NOAA Coast Watch Archive and Access System (NCAAS). To download data, users must register with NODC. A telnet session allows the selection of data, which may then be retrieved by FTP. See the NCAAS page at: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/NCAAS/ncaas-home.html [This summary was derived from NODC Environmental Information Bulletin No. 92-4 and the NODC WWW pages.]

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    IOS component of a multidisciplinary study of Haro Strait.

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    A collaborative study with Canadian, Russian and American partners to study trans-oceanic sections, 1990 to 1993.

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    Publication Title: Summary of Synoptic Meteorological Observations (pub.1975).Contains annual and monthly frequency distribution of cloud height, total cloud cover, relative humidity, dust, fog, visibility, smoke, snow fall, hail, precipitation, sea wave, surface temperature, wind direction and speed, thunder and lightning, and frozen precipitation; also monthly frequency of distribution of low cloud, mean sea level pressure, and sea surface temperature. Includes hourly cloud height, relative humidity, dust, smoke-haze, visibility, snowfall, hail, precipitation, mean sea level pressure, surface temperature, wind direction and speed, frozen precipitation, and thunder and lightning.NOAAServer Codes: [L 85 7 -45 -170] ; nodatelineAvailable from the NOAA Library System: URL http://www.lib.noaa.gov/.

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    Publication Title: Climatic Maps of North America (pub.1936).Contains summarized surface data with monthly sea level isotherms; actual temperatures for Jan. and July; mean annual temperature range; annual maximum and minimum temperatures; mean sea level pressure Jan. and July; mean monthly and annual precipitation; average relative humidity Jan. and July; mean daytime cloudiness Jan. and July; and days with thunderstorms.Discussions of the maps are to be found in Vol. II, Part J of the Handbook, Only the legends are reproduced here. The original size has been retained, which will permit the use of blank bases in order to extract pertinent data from a number of maps for combination onto one. The base map is from Goodeメs Series of Base Maps, North America on Lambertメs Azinuthal Projection, No. 202. The data on which these maps were based were compiled by the government weather services of the United States, Canada, and Mexico.Available from the NOAA Library System: URL http://www.lib.noaa.gov/.

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    Physical oceanographic characterization of Haro Strait in 1977-1978.

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    Fisheries and Oceans Canada and Environment Canada jointly maintain a network of weather buoys in the coastal and offshore waters of British Columbia. The existing weather buoys offer a geographically widespread network for observing the state of B.C.'s coastal ocean and any changes in marine ecosystems resulting from changing climate. The two departments are now working towards the concept of Marine Ecosystem ObServatories (MEOS) , adding new instruments to the buoys for measurements of ocean water properties and key biological fields.The first MEOS buoy has been placed in Saanich Inlet, near the Institute of Ocean Sciences, with easy access for testing and calibrating new sensors and methods. As resources become available, the instruments tested in Saanich Inlet may be added to other buoys in the existing AES/FOC network, or in other specialized locations such as Marine Protected Areas.