From 1 - 10 / 26
  • Categories    

    Measurement Details: profiles of nitrate, phosphate and silicate concentrations PSARC_Utility Variation in surface nutrient concentration may control overall primary productivity in the North Pacific. Control of primary and secondary production in the North Pacific is a issue of ongoing controversy. Changes in nutrients concentrations are likely due to changes in circulation, mixing and fresh water input to the North Pacific. Improvements Develop summary time series with suitable aggregation of data. URL -- ( http://www.jodc.go.jp/service.htm ) [ A TCODE project ]

  • Categories    

    The major objectives of the cruise, in terms of the IGY program were to obtain detailed observations from the deep waters, including those in the Aleutian Trench and to determine, if possible, the nature of the water exchange between the Northern Pacific and the Bering Sea.

  • Categories    

    To date, most lower trophic level research on the eastern Bering Sea shelf has concentrated on the role of the spring diatom bloom as the main annual production event. Over the Middle Shelf Domain, primary and secondary productions occur throughout the summer supported by regenerated nutrients. During this period, standing stock of chlorophyll is relatively low (0.5 - 2 µg/l). Periodic outbreaks of diatoms can occur in response to erosion of the pycnocline and injection of nitrate and silicate into the surface waters. Between these outbreaks, nano- and microzooplankton (<200 µm) are hypothesized to dominate nutrient cycling. During these periods microzooplankton may also provide the intermediary link between small flagellated primary producers and food for juvenile fishes. Recent recurring "blooms" of the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi require us to achieve a better understanding of summertime nutrient recycling and trophic transfer so that we can predict the effect, if any, E. huxleyi will have on higher trophic levels. We plan to dissect the summer pelagic food web and nutrient cycle of the Middle Shelf Domain to determine the relative contribution of microzooplankton to these processes. Specifically we will investigate nutrient cycling and trophic transfer during two distinct phytoplankton communities: small flagellates (coccolithophores or other species) and diatoms. Juvenile Pollock, a nodal species in the Bering Sea ecosystem, forage on particle-grazing mesozooplankton and variations in summer food supply may affect their ability to accumulate energy stores for the harsh Subarctic winters. This project also includes; Evelyn Lessard University of Washington Jeffrey Napp Alaska Fisheries Science Center, NOAA 7600 Sand Point Way NE Seattle, WA 98115 jeff.napp@noaa.gov An NPMR project

  • Categories    

    To date, most lower trophic level research on the eastern Bering Sea shelf has concentrated on the role of the spring diatom bloom as the main annual production event. Over the Middle Shelf Domain, primary and secondary productions occur throughout the summer supported by regenerated nutrients. During this period, standing stock of chlorophyll is relatively low (0.5 - 2 µg/l). Periodic outbreaks of diatoms can occur in response to erosion of the pycnocline and injection of nitrate and silicate into the surface waters. Between these outbreaks, nano- and microzooplankton (<200 µm) are hypothesized to dominate nutrient cycling. During these periods microzooplankton may also provide the intermediary link between small flagellated primary producers and food for juvenile fishes. Recent recurring "blooms" of the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi require us to achieve a better understanding of summertime nutrient recycling and trophic transfer so that we can predict the effect, if any, E. huxleyi will have on higher trophic levels. We plan to dissect the summer pelagic food web and nutrient cycle of the Middle Shelf Domain to determine the relative contribution of microzooplankton to these processes. Specifically we will investigate nutrient cycling and trophic transfer during two distinct phytoplankton communities: small flagellates (coccolithophores or other species) and diatoms. Juvenile Pollock, a nodal species in the Bering Sea ecosystem, forage on particle-grazing mesozooplankton and variations in summer food supply may affect their ability to accumulate energy stores for the harsh Subarctic winters. This project also includes; Evelyn Lessard University of Washington Jeffrey Napp Alaska Fisheries Science Center, NOAA 7600 Sand Point Way NE Seattle, WA 98115 jeff.napp@noaa.gov An NPMR project

  • Categories    

    Nutrient analyses from bottle samples at discrete depths An NPMR project

  • Categories    

    profiles of temperature, salinity, oxygen and nutrients Measurement Details profiles of temperature, salinity, oxygen and nutrients for the world's oceans. Also includes objectively analyzed Climatology fields (annual, seasonal and monthly) Publication World Ocean Atlas 1994 - CD-ROM Data Set Documentation. National Oceanographic Data Center - Informal Report No. 13, November, 1994. Other Comments Tools for inspecting climatological fields are available at http://rainbow.ldgo.columbia.edu. Other viewing tools located at: http://ferret.wrc.noaa.gov/fbin/climate_server. World Ocean Database 1998 will replace this, http://www.nodc.noaa.gov A TCODE project

  • Categories    

    The Bering Sea is one of the most productive oceans on earth. Scientists studying the Bering Sea say that's thanks to massive ocean eddies that behave like some sort of oceanic hurricane to bring life-sustaining nutrients up from the abyss. Doug Schneider has more in this week's Arctic Science Journeys Radio.

  • Categories    

    Parameter profiles of temperature, salinity, density and nutrients Measurement Details a set of oceanographic data having repetitive samples along sections or at fixed stations over long time periods. Other Comments Compiled from WDC -A oceanographic station database, so contents are a subset of the contents of World Ocean Atlas, 1994 Base Internet/URL ( http://www.nodc.noaa.gov ) ( http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/CDR-detdesc/time-series.html ) [ A TCODE project ]

  • Categories    

    Oceanographic data collected on 79 stations in the northern Bering and Bering Strait during 8-19 July 1968 are presented and interpreted. The data include observations of the temperature, salinity dissolved oxygen and current velocity made at 5-meter intervals from sea surface to the bottom, Contoured sections of the data are also presented.

  • Categories    

    Parameter profiles of temperature, salinity, oxygen and nutrients Measurement Details "Physical oceanographic profiles Over one million profiles dating back before 1900 Updated weekly: 80,000 new profiles per year. Global coverage, but primarily in north western hemisphere XBT, BT, CTD, Bottle, Bathy/Tesac. Inventory from XBT, BT, CTD and Bottle Archives for 1975 - 1979 (165K) Inventory from XBT, BT, CTD and Bottle Archives for 1980 - 1984 (149K) Inventory from XBT, BT, CTD and Bottle Archives for 1985 - 1989 (149K) Inventory from XBT, BT, CTD and Bottle Archives for 1990 - 1995 (116K)" global, but primary focus is North Atlantic, North Pacific and Arctic oceans IOSPBS Data Distribution Most high quality, high resolution data for coastal B.C. waters exist at IOS and MEDS. Recent data may not be available from MEDS. Data are stored on-line in the DATA_LIBRARY (DATA_LIB). Search tools are available to select specific subsets of these data, matching user-specified search criteria. PSARC_Utility "Probably of little direct use in stock assessment. There are significant issues of data quality and distribution that make automated ""aggregation"" of the data tricky. Potentially, these data could be used to create water column climatologies (and anomalies) for user-specified areas/regions." Improvements "Improved software tools for ""slicing, dicing"" and aggregation of these data would be useful." Base Internet/URL -- http://www.meds.dfo.ca [ A TCODE project ]