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    Oceanographic data in Bristol Bay and the Bering Sea obtained aboard the U.S Coast Guard Tug Redwing during the summer months of 1939, 1940 and 1941 in conjunction with the exploratory fishing conducted in the area are presented. Temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, phosphates, nitrites and silicates are tabulated for 331 stations in 1939, 184 in 1940 and 40 in 1941. Interpolated values of temperature and salinity and computed values of density, specific volume anomaly and dynamic height at standard depths are presented.

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    Contains various small sets of University of Alaska Fairbanks oceanographic data such as light transmission, fisheries, cloud cover, sea surface temperature, sediment chemistry, water chemistry, ADCP (acoustic Doppler current profiler), nitrogen uptake, iron, and oxygen consumption data. Some data are archived on 9-track tape, some in report form and are held by individual scientists.

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    The broad continental shelf extending beneath the Bering and Chukchi seas from Siberia to Alaska holds great interest for biogeographers. It has been the site, repeatedly, of a land connection and thus of a migration route for land biota between Asia and North America; and when this land connection has been interrupted, as it is at present, the resulting seaway has been an avenue of migration for marine biota between the North Pacific and North Atlantic oceans. Knowledge of the history and past environments of land bridges and seaways in this area must be sought largely through the study of the late Cenozic sediments exposed along the Alaskan and Siberian shores of the Bering and Chukchi Seas and through attempts to establish the synchronicity of individual sets of late Cenozoic sediments on opposite sides of Bering Strait.[Reference: Hopkins, D.M., MacNeil, F.S., Merklin, R.L., and Petrov, O.M., 1965, Quaternary correlations across Bering Strait: Science, v. 147, no. 3662, p.1107-1114. ]

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    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Ocean Environment Research Division established a geographic information system (GIS) for integrating multidisciplinary oceanographic data collected throughout the eastern North Pacific Ocean. Data collected by remote-sensing techniques include satellite imagery of sea surface temperature, seafloor bathymetry derived from multibeam sonar systems, and environmental acoustic signals from bottom-mounted and portable hydrophone arrays. Acoustic monitoring is directed at the detection and location of water-borne signals of seafloor earthquakes (T-waves) and whales. Field observations include seafloor geologic mapping and whale sightings. Seafloor mapping information is gathered using submersibles, towed-camera systems, and other towed water-sampling devices. A GIS allows the integration and analysis of these diverse and various spatial data and formats within a single computer architecture accessible through an easy-to-use graphical user interface. The GIS system described here has combined earthquake-source parameter information with acoustic locations and seafloor bathymetric data to provide new tectonic models of NE Pacific oceanic plate boundaries. Similarly, whale locations are mapped and compared to oceanographic features such as bathymetry and sea surface temperatures using GIS.