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    Arctic Ocean buoy data products are 12-hourly interpolated pressure, temperature, position, and ice velocity grids. Buoys deployed on ice floes measure atmospheric pressure and temperature at ocean surface; an average of 20 buoys are in service at any time. Grid is 2 minutes longitude by 10 minutes latitude. The current pressure and temperature analysis use the synoptic buoy observations supplemented by the NMC surface fields. The buoy ice velocity fields are analyzed from 24-hour displacements. These procedures are outlined in the 1982 buoy report. The pressure fields have been reanalyzed in 1996 to correct a coding error in the calculation of the second derivative, dpp/dxy; these data are available now. Temperature fields for 1979-1986 have been analyzed using the 1982 procedure, but a new analysis combining synoptic buoy data and land station observations will be available in early 1997. As of July 1997 gridded data are available for 1979-1996. Data are ASCII (tabular); format is described in annual data reports. An online guide is available for this data set. Data are available via FTP.Reference:Rigor, I. 2002. IABP Drifting Buoy, Pressure, Temperature, Position, and Interpolated Ice Velocity. Compiled by the Polar Science Center, Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, Seattle, in association with NSIDC. Boulder, CO: National Snow and Ice Data Center. Digital media.

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    This report presents a series of computer-generated maps detailing the spatial and temporal distributions of 37 invertebrate species in the Bering, Chukchi, and Beaufort seas region. The maps illustrate the information content of the living marine resources Computer Mapping and Assessment System (Cmas) developed for the region, and serve as a reference for system users. Similar maps have been developed for fishes (21 species), marine birds (26 species), and marine mammals (14 species) as part of the SEA Division's atlas development process. A digital database and supporting software provide straightforward access to simple, yet informative analytical capabilities, such as developing composite distributions using a variety of weighting schemes for any combination of species, species characteristics, life history stages, time periods, or spatial units. NOAAServer Codes: [OL 72 55 -130 -168] ; nodateline obtain

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    We examined coexistence at sea among 7 taxa of diving, wing-propelled seabirds (Alcidae) in the genera Aethia, Uria, Cepphus, and Fratercula. Species abundances were measured simultaneously with a suite of environmental factors in the northern Bering Sea, Alaska, USA; data from 260 adjacent and non-adjacent sites occupied by alcids foraging offshore near breeding colonies were then subjected to principal component analysis (PCA). We used PCA to group redundant environmental descriptors, to identify orthogonal axes for constructing a multi-dimensional niche, and to differentiate species associations within niche dimensions from species associations among niche dimensions. Decomposition of the correlation matrix for 22 environmental and 7 taxonomic variables with PCA gave 14 components (10 environmental and 4 species interactions) that retained 90% of the original available variance. Acid abundances (all species) were most strongly correlated with axes representing tidal stage, a time-area interaction (due to sampling layout), water masses, and a temporal or intra-seasonal trend partially associated with weather changes. Axes representing tidal stage, 2 gradients in macro-habitat (Anadyr and Bering Shelf Water masses), the micro-habitat of the sea surface, and an air-sea interaction were most important for detecting differences among species within niche dimensions. Contrary to assumptions of competition, none of 4 compound variables describing primarily species-interactions gave strong evidence for negative associations between acid taxa sharing similar body sizes and feeding requirements. This exploratory analysis supports the view that alcids may segregate along environmental gradients at sea. But in this community, segregation was unrelated to foraging distance from colonies, in part because foraging 'substrate' was highly variable in structure, location, and areal extent. We contend that coexistence within this seabird group is facilitated via expanded niche dimensions created from a complex marine environment.

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    The Ocean Biogeographic Information System (OBIS) is a web-based provider of global geo-referenced information on marine species. The OBIS Alaska provides data of the Alaska region.OBIS provides, on an ムopen accessメ basis through the World Wide Web: taxonomically and geographically resolved data on marine life and the ocean environment; interactivity with similar databases; access to interactive physical oceanographic data at regional and global scales; and software tools for biogeographic analysis.Comments or problems encountered using the OBIS should be addressed to obissupport@marine.rutgers.edu.

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    CM: Current Meters were deployed in the Arctic Ocean and Greenland Sea from 1971-1988. Measures of zonal and meridonal velocities, temperature and salinity were recorded. This data was used to determine ice flow and flow regimes in the high Arctic region.

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    In this paper, the distributions of nine dominant marine mammal species of the Bering, Chukchi, and Beaufort Seas region have been subjected to principal components analysis. The six species assemblages that resulted from this analysis imply some degree of habitat partitioning. The distribution patterns of these assemblages appear to correlate with sea-ice conditions. For example, a northern Bering Sea assemblage is strongly correlated with broken pack. Also, some areas lack strong association with any assemblage, notably Shpanberg Strait, east of St. Lawrence Island. However, the associations identified and presented are hypothetical, and are in need of further testing. Factors other than sea ice must be taken into account in explaining assemblage distributions and interactions between species and the environment. NOAAServer Codes: [OL 72 55 -130 -168] ; nodateline obtain

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    CTD: High resolution vertical profiles of conductivity, temperature, and pressure. Additional sensors may include dissolved oxygen or other biological/chemical sensors (nephelometers, flurometers)

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    The MS-9 (ocean engineering in frigid environments) of the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers created and implemented a selected bibliography for use by developers and planners. It contains abstracts of selected reports and journal articles that cover the range of problems associated with marine systems operating in ice-covered waters. The emphasis is on marine transportation rather than marine structures. The location for the source document is given. There are author/investigator and subject indexes.

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    NCDC Monthly Temperature Anomalies (1856-1994) The data set of Monthly Temperature Anomalies was developed at The National Climatic Data Center (NCDC). In June 1995, the NOAA Baseline Temperature dataset was merged with a gridded data set of sea surface temperatures to give a truly global anomaly product. The ocean dataset is a compilation of data from the United Kingdom Meteorological Office and the Comprehensive Oceanic and Atmospheric Data Set (COADS). Monthly updates are performed by ERL using the GTS ship reports. This dataset extends from 1856 to 1994.

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    The Ocean Biogeographic Information System (OBIS) is a web-based provider of global geo-referenced information on marine species.OBIS provides, on an ムopen accessメ basis through the World Wide Web: taxonomically and geographically resolved data on marine life and the ocean environment; interactivity with similar databases; access to interactive physical oceanographic data at regional and global scales; and software tools for biogeographic analysis.Comments or problems encountered using the OBIS should be addressed to obissupport@marine.rutgers.edu.